Roma

Media  Audio  
Ukraine Calling

album

Eastblok Music (Germany) CD, 2006

NamePlay TimeLyrics
Кохання (Aді Цитрині)
0:60Lyrics
Чуєш?!
0:59Lyrics
Немає Хліба - співай!
0:60Lyrics
Листопад
0:60Lyrics
Shidi-Ridi
0:60Lyrics
Божественна Тромпіта
0:60Lyrics
Долинов, Долинов
0:60Lyrics
Сумний Святий Вечір
0:60Lyrics
Сім Бід
0:60Lyrics
На тому Боці
0:60Lyrics
Під Облавком
0:60Lyrics
Ukraine Calling
0:60Lyrics

 

When the Soviet Union collapsed,  Ukraine started to breathe the fresh air of independence again. At that time, during the early 90’s, a group of students set up the band Aktus, which quickly made itself a name in the underground Kyiv music scene. Aktus turned to the sounds of reggae, ska, and punk. With the addition of vocalist Olexandr Yarmola and accordionist Ivan Lenyo, both well-known and respected in folk circles, the band increasingly incorporated elements of Ukrainian folk music into their compositions. Since the very beginning, Aktus has engaged in constant touring of Europe. Unlike most popular Ukrainian music groups who propagate Soviet style trash pop (so-called Estrada), or copies of Western and American styles, Aktus sought to introduce elements of Ukrainian folk music through a cross-cultural mix including Reggae and Ska. At the start of the new millennium the band realized it was time to establish an even firmer tie to their own culture, and changed their name to Haydamaky, in honor of the historical Haydamaky’s rebellion, which took place in Ukraine in the 18th century. This was a reaction of Ukrainian peasants and serfs against repressive foreign occupation. Haydamaky represents this image of folklore tradition and rebellion. The music of Haydamaky is inspired by various ethnic sounds from around the world, especially from various regions of Ukraine, such as Polissya, Bukovyna, and Zakarpathia. Other influences include folk punk and reggae. The band calls their music Carpathian Ska. Haydamaky’s hope is to forge an inherently Ukrainian popular music style, which looks back on its own heritage and traditions as a source for inspiration. Their self-titled debut album was released in January 2002. Since the time of the album’s release the band has participated in various festivals and also played a club tour in Western Europe. Their colourful live shows are unique, boasting bright costumes, special light settings and, of course, the pure mountain energy and musical mastership of the band. On the road, during their extensive tours, Haydamaky became the close family they are today. And the music developed confidently. Several songs for the second album Boguslav (released in April 2004) had been written just before coming on stage, where they were performed right away for the first time. The album developed into a very eclectic mix of ska, dub, reggae, punk and, of course, Ukrainian melodies. The band had finally found their very own style. After the band had staged concerts in support of the Orange Revolution in their home country, Eastblok Music released a song by Haydamaky for the first time on the compilation ‘Ukraina - songs of the orange revolution’. ‘Boguslav’; became one of the most favored songs and got airplayed on several alternative radio stations. The quality of their third album, finally, enthralled us to such an extent, that we decided to sign this band and introduce them to the Western World. Haydamaky play a unique mixture, which has not been heard so far on our shores. Albeit the fact, that the Ukraine lies in Europe and we are virtually neighbors, this country still is a sleeping beauty. Haydamaky manage to build bridges and combine Ukrainian roots, which spring in the mysterious Carpathian Mountains, and Western production standards. They fit this mixture into tight arrangements, which are only let loose in their fierce live experience. Their music live and on record is characterized by turbulent energy and a rollercoaster of tempo and moods. Even, if you don’t understand the lyrics, you will be filled with the music from top to toe and feel the passion. Spivay!

Armin Siebert

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